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Analysis of the Declaration of Independence

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❶We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. The conclusion is important in clarifying the identity of the new nation, as well as defining the powers granted to the new government.

Summary and Analysis of The Declaration of Independence

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Introduction
From the SparkNotes Blog

The Declaration's introduction establishes the people's right to separate themselves from a tyrannical government. The body gives evidence that the British government has acted tyrannically. The conclusion states that free and independent states possess the power to:. Signing the Declaration was an act of treason. The signers, in the Declaration's conclusion, openly declare themselves enemies to the British crown.

The word "ought", used twice in the conclusion, implies moral correctness and makes a final appeal to Natural Law. The conclusion makes several appeals to God. Its authors call upon divine intervention to aid their cause and appeal to God in order to persuade the nations of the world of the justness of their act.

When taking the nation's founding document and the intent of its framers into acount, the modern liberal notion that images of God and other references to Deity are opposed to liberty and should be removed from public buildings is ludicrous at best and treasonous at worst.

Feel free to share your own thoughts by in the comments. The line of reasoning used by the document's writers is as follows: Governments are created to secure certain unalienable rights, rights that are granted, not by government or man, but by God.

This is called an appeal to Natural Law. It is apparent the founding fathers felt that God should play an important part in the government of man; they do not, however, go into detail on the nature of that God. This, as repeated nearly a decade later in the Bill of Rights, is up to the individual and a right which, also, cannot be taken away by government.

When government takes away these rights, the governed have just cause to overthrow or separate themselves from that government. The thought that people had a right to overthrow government was revolutionary, although the premise had been stated by philosophers in the past--John Locke, for example. The Declaration contends that although the right to rebel exists, human nature dictates that people will not do so over light and transient causes, choosing rather to suffer than rebel in most cases.

Great Britain is guilty of attempting to take away the aforementioned God given rights; therefore, the colonists are justified in separating themselves from Great Britain. Jefferson and the committee use deductive reasoning to make their case, stating first the principal and then supplying evidence in the body of the document.

Pauline Meier points out that Jefferson, in the introduction, uses an "eighteenth-century rhetorical method by which one phrase was piled on another, but their point became clear only at the end. The conclusion is important in clarifying the identity of the new nation, as well as defining the powers granted to the new government.

Many of the delegates to the Second Continental Convention saw the Declaration of Independence as important because of the message it would send to foreign nations. They were especially concerned with enlisting the military help of the French in their war against Great Britain. They therefore thought it necessary to assert clearly that they had no allegiance or connection to Great Britain. The new nation is not only named in this conclusion as the United States of America, but its authority is defined as well.

The conclusion serves to establish the authority of the Second Continental Congress over issues of international affairs, war and peace, and trade. With these powers in hand, the Congress is empowered to run the affairs of government related to the declared war.

However, the conclusion is unclear regarding the individual states' responsibilities to each other. The Declaration describes itself as a union of colonies, each of which is a free and independent state. This is problematic because the statement indicates that the colonies are one united whole, while simultaneously stating that each state is free and independent.

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Essay on Declaration of Independence - Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence was brought forth in a unanimous act to Declare the thirteen United States of America to become Independent. This was taken place on July 4, by the Second Continental Congress for the citizens of the United States.

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The Declaration of Independence expresses America's foundation and independence and the basic freedoms that this nation strives to embody, such as "life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness". The important thing about the Declaration of Independence is .

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In conclusion, the declaration of independence is a document that jump-started the United States. It explains why they had to the right to separate from Great Britain, and many unjust actions they inflicted upon the colonies. The declaration is a very thorough complex document that would not worked in any other format. - Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence was brought forth in a unanimous act to Declare the thirteen United States of America to become Independent. This was taken place on July 4, by the Second Continental Congress for the citizens of the United States.

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The Declaration of Independence, written by Thomas Jefferson, presented a fine example of a compelling persuasive essay. Jefferson's essay is so compelling because of his incredibly brave thesis statement, which he supported in the body of his text, as well as his equally powerful conclusion. The Goals of the Declaration of Independence Essay Words | 5 Pages The Goals of the Declaration of Independence The American Revolution was not only a battle between the British and the colonists; it was a historical movement that brought about new ways of .