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How to Get a 9 on Poetry Analysis FRQ in AP English Literature

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You can expect to see excerpts of prose and poetry. You will, in general, not be given an author, date, or title for these works, although occasionally the title of a poem is given. Unusual words are also sometimes defined for you. The date ranges of works could fall from the 16th to the 21st century. Most works will be originally written in English, although you may occasionally see a passage in translation.

There are, generally speaking, eight kinds of questions you can expect to see on the AP English Literature and Composition test. Without further ado, here are the eight question types you can expect to see on the AP lit exam. These are questions that test your ability to understand what the passage is saying on a pretty basic level.

Basically, words that point to a fairly concrete register of meaning. You can succeed on these questions by careful reading of the text. You may have to go back and re-read parts to make sure you understand what the passage is saying. The key to these questions is to not be tripped up by the fact that you are making an inference—there will be a best answer, and it will be the choice that is best supported by what is actually found in the passage.

In many ways, inference questions are like second-level reading comprehension questions—you need to know not just what a passage says, but what it means. These are questions in which you have to either identify what word or phrase is figurative language or provide the meaning of a figurative phrase. You can identify these as they will either explicitly mention figurative language or a figurative device like simile or metaphor or will include a figurative language phrase in the question itself.

What is the phrase referring to? These questions involve identifying why an author does what they do: Why did the author use these particular words or this particular structure? These questions will ask you to describe something about a character. This is, in many ways, a special kind of inference question since you are inferring the broader personality of the character based on the evidence in a passage.

Also, these crop up much more commonly for prose passages than poetry ones. What is the overall picture created by all the tiny details? Some questions will ask you about specific structural elements of the passage—a shift in tone, a digression, the specific form of a poem, etc.

Being able to identify and understand the significance of any shifts —structural, tonal, in genre, etc—will be of key importance for these questions. Very occasionally you will be asked a specific grammar question, such as what word an adjective is modifying.

I would also include in this category very specific questions like the meter of a poem i. These questions are less about the literary artistry and more about the fairly dry technique involved in having a fluent command of the English language.

Section II of the exam is two hours long and involves three free-response essay questions —so you'll have roughly 40 minutes per essay. Note, though, that no one will prompt you to move from essay to essay, so you can theoretically divide up the time how you want but be sure to leave enough time for each essay.

The first two essays are literary analysis essays of specific passages, with one poem and one prose excerpt—and the final is an analysis of a given theme in a work selected by you, the student. One of the passages will be poetry, and one will be prose. You will be provided with the author of the work, the approximate date, and some orienting information i.

Sample Questions from Free Response Questions. Stick to safe bets like authors in the list on pages of the Course and Exam Description. As you can see, the list of works provided spans many different time periods and countries: As on other AP exams, your raw score will be converted to a score from For the multiple-choice section, you receive a point for each question you answer correctly. Scoring for multiple choice is pretty straightforward. However, essay scoring is a little more complicated.

Each of your essays will receive a score from based on the College Board rubric. While all of the rubrics are broadly similar, there are some minor differences between each of them. These essays persuasively address the assigned task.

These essays offer a range of interpretations; they provide a convincing reading and analysis of the poem.

They demonstrate consistent and effective control over the elements of composition appropriate to the analysis of poetry. Their textual references are apt and specific. Though they may not be error-free, these essays are perceptive in their analysis and demonstrate writing that is clear and sophisticated, and in the case of a 9 essay, especially persuasive.

Your argument is convincing and it addresses all elements of the prompt. You interpret the language of the poem in a variety of ways i. Your essay is particularly well-written and well-organized.

You appropriately reference specific moments in the poem to support your argument. A 9 essay is particularly persuasive.

These essays reasonably address the assigned task. They are less thorough or less precise in the way they address the task, and their analysis is less convincing. These essays demonstrate an ability to express ideas clearly, making references to the text, although they do not exhibit the same level of effective writing as the papers.

Essays scored a 7 present better-developed analysis and more consistent command of the elements of effective composition than do essays scored a 6. You address all elements of the prompt, but your analysis is not as complete or convincing as a essay. You do make specific references to the poem and your writing is clear and effective, but not necessarily masterful.

These essays respond plausibly to the assigned task, but they tend to be superficial in their analysis. They often rely on paraphrase, which may contain some analysis, implicit or explicit. Their analysis may be vague, formulaic, or minimally supported by references to the text. There may be minor misinterpretations of the poem. These essays demonstrate some control of language, but they may be marred by surface errors. These essays are not as well conceived, organized, or developed as essays.

You answer the prompt in a way that is not implausible or unreasonable, but your analysis of the poem is surface-level. You may paraphrase the poem instead of making specific references to its language.

You may not adequately support your analysis of the poem, or you may misinterpret it slightly. Your essay is not a total mess, but not necessarily particularly well-organized or argued. These lower-half essays fail to offer an adequate analysis of the poem. The analysis may be partial, unconvincing, or irrelevant, or ignore part of the assigned task. Evidence from the poem may be slight or misconstrued, or the essays may rely on paraphrase only.

The essays often demonstrate a lack of control over the conventions of composition: Essays scored a 3 may contain significant misreading, demonstrate inept writing, or do both.

You do not adequately address the prompt. Your analysis of the poem is incomplete or incorrect, or you do not reference any specific language of the poem. Your essay is undeveloped, unclear, or poorly organized. A 3 essay either significantly misinterprets the poem or is particularly poorly written. These essays compound the weaknesses of the papers in the 4—3 range. These essays may contain serious errors in grammar and mechanics. The newly-released sample AP English Literature and Composition exam questions, sample responses, and grading rubrics provide a valuable opportunity to analyze how to achieve high scores on each of the three Section II FRQ responses.

However, for purposes of this examination, the Poetry Analysis strategies will be the focus. Exam takers were asked to analyze the following: All three provide a teaching opportunity for achieving a nine on the poetry analysis essay.

The first sample essay, the A essay, quickly and succinctly introduces the author, title, thesis, elements, and devices. The writer leaves nothing to guesswork. However, the writer wastes space and precious time five whole lines!

The third sample lacks cohesiveness, a thesis statement, and organization. To sum up, make introductions brief and compact, using specific details from the poem and a clear direction that address the call of the prompt. Short, choppy, disconnected sentences make an incoherent, unclear paragraph.

Cut to the chase; be specific. The A answer first supports the thesis by pointing out that alliteration and rhyme scheme depict the mood and disconnection of both the speaker and the crowd. The writer does this by noting how alliteration appears when the juggler performs, but not before. The student also notes how the mood and connection to the crowd cohere when the juggler juggles, the balls defying gravity and uplifting the crowd with the balls.

Then, the writer wraps up the first point about description, devices, and elements by concluding that the unusual rhyme scheme echoes the unusual feat of juggling and controlling the mood of the crowd. Again, the student uses clear, logical, and precise quotes and references to the poem without wasting time on unsupported statements. Specific illustrations anchor each point. For example, the student identifies the end rhyme as an unusual effect that mimics the unusual and gravity-defiant balls.

Tying up the first paragraph, the student then goes on to thoroughly explain the connection between the cited rhyme scheme, the unique defiance of gravity, and the effect on the speaker.

The organizational plan is as follows: The writer simply concludes without proving that assertion. The free-response section tests students' ability to analyze and interpret literary texts by composing clear and effective essays. Encourage your students to visit the AP English Literature and Composition student page for exam information and exam practice. For free-response questions from prior exams, along with scoring information, check out the tables below.

Be sure to review the Chief Reader Report. In this invaluable resource, the Chief Reader of the AP Exam compiles feedback from members of the reading leadership to describe how students performed on the FRQs, summarize typical student errors, and address specific concepts and content with which students have struggled the most that year. You can also watch the Chief Reader Report Module. In this presentation, the Chief Reader of the exam, David G. Miller of Mississippi College, gives a brief and helpful walkthrough of the highlights of his Chief Reader Report.

This is the core document for this course. It clearly lays out the course content and describes the exam and AP Program in general.

AP English Literature: Exam Format and Question Types

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How to Get a 9 on Poetry Analysis FRQ in AP English Literature. You don’t want your reader to have to work hard to understand any part of your essay. By repeating recapped points, you help the reader pull the argument together and wrap up. To get a 9 on the poetry analysis essay in the AP Literature and Composition exam, practice.

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The AP Literature exam is a three-hour exam: It includes one question, hour-long multiple-choice section based on four-five prose and poetry passages, and a two hour free-response section with three essays—one analyzing a poetry passage, one analyzing a prose passage, and one analyzing a work chosen by the student. AP English Literature and Composition Course Description— This is the core document for this course. It clearly lays out the course content and describes the exam and AP Program in general.